Until the Fruit Falls Off

I’ve declared a hibernation for the summer. This means I am basically giving myself permission to say no to social invitations and say no to people that ask for help, and not to feel bad about it. I had found myself becoming very grumpy and impatient with everybody lately, so I figured this was overdue.

But I’ve realized that holing myself up in my room could get pretty ugly too. In my alone time all I want to do is work on the books and illustrations I haven’t had time to work on. And I’m already getting neck aches from doing nothing but that! Not to mention I could easily become self-indulgent, self-serving, and my heart is at risk of becoming very small.

After talking to my roommates about it I think I realized at least one way to tell when we’re giving ourselves too much to one thing or another.

It is when we are into something so heavily that we stop bearing the fruits of the spirit, that we probably need a rest from it.

And even though more introvert time will help some of us with that, another friend told me that only after giving God 5 or 6 hours of his Sunday afternoon did he remember what true rest was like. “More time with God” is a totally churchy answer. But I’ve been reflecting on this and for me I think it really is true! And the time in silence sitting in front of that big fat open book itself isn’t what will help. But using that time to re-orient our goals to be God’s goals for us, and to remind ourselves that we should only feel compelled to do the things he asks us to do. That he loves us regardless and will take care of us. That we should strive to our best in what we do, and to keep coming to him for our rest. His yoke is easy and his burden is light. And being gently guided in this yoke is where we will bear the most delicious, everlasting fruit that will feed the world.

3 Responses to Until the Fruit Falls Off

  1. Diane Fender says:

    This is well said and written! I’ve been meditating on this same concept for the past week. It is truth.

    • raw spoon says:

      Yes! Thank you, Diane! And thanks for commenting. I’m a slow learner but this has been important for me to learn. Glad I’m not alone :)

      • Diane Fender says:

        Absolutely! I can identify with a lot of the truthful reflections here. It is nice to read them in an open forum and know others are wrestling and thinking about similar things in regard to life and faith. I have found that the greatest lessons often have to be learned and re-learned. It is an arduous process but I think it will be/is worth it. He really does love us in spite of ourselves.

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